Elevated by Design: The Most Beautiful Smoking Accessories

Welcome to the era of sophisticated cannabis. Dispensaries that operate like Apple stores now provide a selection of beautifully packaged cannabis products in just about every form imaginable. With countless states turning to legalization, many designers and brands are truly disrupting the market of tacky head-shop accessories and giving us upscale smoke-ware made for cleanly consuming cannabis. There’s no need to stow away your smoking accessories when they come in as many pretty colors, shapes and forms as the ones featured here. We compiled a short list of the hands-down, best-designed one-hitters, pipes and bongs that are so chic they double as home décor.

 

Summerland Ceramics

Writer Joe Franklin’s belief that “simplicity, carried to an extreme, becomes elegance” couldn’t ring truer than with Summerland Ceramics’ impeccably minimal smoke-ware. The San Francisco-based brand has become known for its handcrafted ceramic pieces that appeal to the sophisticated smoker with clean designs that function as both art and pipes. And unlike most smoking accessories, Summerland’s stark white and natural terra cotta finishes don’t draw undue attention… throw in the neck and Mom will probably think you’ve invested in a new plant. While the brand’s pipes—including the nostalgic white apple-shaped Fruit Fantasy and sleek faceted gem-like Crystal Voyager— and soulfully elegant bongs have made Summerland a unique force in the smoke-ware space, they’ve also introduced hemp clothing, housewares and hand-rolled incense to their splendidly curated line.

 

Yew Yew

Even as an avid smoker, I really don’t like the way that most pipes look, from the swirling hodge-podge of colored glass to their bulbous shapes. Thankfully there’s Yew Yew, a young brand that makes sleek architectural pipes. Founder and designer Jenny Wichman has crafted quaint triangular and half moon-shaped ceramic pipes in a variety of pastel colorways that can easily be displayed on a coffee table and be mistaken for art (or chic incense holders). Form truly meets function with Yew Yew’s discreet, sculptural designs, which exude a light, fun, relatable vibe while functioning with ease and not losing sight of crucial quality. What’s most impressive about the brand’s progression over the last two years is how it’s  evolved into a platform to help change the stigma around cannabis—without taking themselves too seriously and often collaborating with female artists to design products that make smoking even better.

 

Miwak Junior

Combining influences from pre-Columbian culture, futuristic space-age lines and the clean minimalism of Japanese design, Miwak Junior makes functional art. What started as an experiment in a college ceramics class (that is, Chilean artist Sebastian Boher’s attempts to sneak a pipe into the kiln) is now range of circular, spherical and flying saucer-shaped pipes that comfortably fit in the hand. The hollow interior provides a deceptively large chamber for smoke, and the hand-finished exterior creates an exceptionally smooth feel. Each hand-glazed non-porous bowl is easy to clean and provides a welcome pop of bold color To totally elevate the stoner aesthetic into one your 16-year-old self would never recognize.

 

Laundry Day

Is there anything more characteristic of the ’70s than the amber and monstera plant-green glasses that adorned light fixtures, water pitchers and glasses throughout the funky decade? Laundry Day’s line of design-forward smoke-ware puts ’70s elements through a modern lens to create sleek, sophisticated and playful accessories. Founded with a mission to change the visual narrative behind cannabis use, Laundry Day products are crafted to double as home decor —take one look at the “Hudson” or “Charlotte” and you’ll understand why these pipes can so easily be seen as decorations—and dispel stigmas to make the ritual that millions of people take part in every day more inclusive and approachable.

 

The Pursuit of Happiness

All roads lead to happiness when you bring art into everyday routines. Step one: Buy yourself the “Del Mar Pipe” from ceramics brand The Pursuit of Happiness. Made of stoneware  cast from a found shell, this gorgeous pipe comfortably fits in the palm of your hand and evokes the serenity of relaxing on a warm secluded beach. Drawing inspiration from the oddities of nature, mid-century design and nostalgic memories, TPOH is the complete opposite of mass-production: All products—including the minimal Aero pipe and the slim Voltaire one-hitter that’s finished with 22-karat gold—are made by hand a few at a time (usually only five to ten of each design).

 

Make Good Choices

Designer Alex Simon has a knack for playing with form and function and going in the opposite direction of what people might think. It’s for the same reason that lipstick cases, pickles and Bic-style lighters are all staples to Simon’s lineup of funky smoking accessories.

 

Haciendaware

Los Angeles’ smog-enhanced sunsets prove an inspiration for the gorgeous gradients and dreamy hues of Haciendaware’s stoneware pipes. Handmade and airbrushed for a smooth finish, you’ll feel like you’re staring into the hazy sunset that lingers off the coast of Malibu every time you use one of these delightful ombré pipes. The pastel hues—light pinks, faded mint greens, pale toasted yellows and sun-worn blues—evoke a rainbow of ice cream colors that when applied to the Bauhaus-inspired shapes demonstrate how design-focused Haciendaware is.

 

 

 

Honorable mentions: Native Silver, Sister Ceramics, Candy Relics, Debbie Carlos

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Author: Alex Khatchadourian

Alex KhatchadourianAlex Khatchadourian is a nationally published writer and editor from Los Angeles. As the founder and editor-in-chief of the print arts and culture magazine, Amadeus, which functions as a space for artists to present their work and express their creativity, she's worked with hundreds of artists, musicians, and tastemakers in a range of creative mediums. Her work has and continues to be steeped in community building and creative collaboration.

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